If King David Had an I-Phone (Technology Threatens Creativity)

We mused over the Psalm of David this morning, and I stopped mid-sentence, because that’s when it came to me, and said to my kids: “Aren’t you glad David didn’t have an I-phone!”

Imagine it: Selfies with sheep. Status updates about how bored he is. Tweets about what a rough life he has. No doubt photos of the lion he killed WITH HIS BARE HANDS, the perfect makings of a narcissistic hot-head.

Despite all that we’ve gained with fast-paced technology, I’m afraid much has been lost. Having the world of information in the palm of our hands, alerting us to every message, update and Tweet, tempting us to record each moment instead of live it, does something tragic to our creative side: it distracts it away.

Not only are we too distracted to create and produce meaningful things, we lose the very ability as the world of instant, fast and byte-sized, short-circuits the mental inertia and stamina great creations require.

King David produced some of the most magnificent literary works in the world because he had time, quietness and focus. Those are important things. Important enough to fight for in this era where “newer and better” fiercely compete.

Perhaps expression and creativity will simply evolve and adapt to this new challenge. But still I wonder if the great works like the Psalms will become fewer and farther between.

My challenge to you as a parent, as I combat this technology over-load myself, is that we would resist the pressure to let our children hop on the hamster wheel of social media, especially at young ages, in an attempt to give them plenty of room to create, think and become. They won’t die without a device, or with hefty restrictions, or whatever you choose. They WILL thank you when they’re older, and they recognize what a gift they have been given by your taking.

6 Responses to “If King David Had an I-Phone (Technology Threatens Creativity)”

  1. 6 arrows says:

    Bingo and a fist-bump. We did a cold-turkey, drastic reduction in screen time with the pre-adult children a couple weeks ago. Everybody survived and, dare I say it, even thrived for a time.

    Then I let my guard down, and we’re pretty much back to where we were. 🙁

    But THIS is just the kick in the pants, get back on the horse and try again, that I needed!

    Amen and THANK YOU! (Yes, I am shouting.) 🙂

  2. Hayley Ferguson says:

    I totally agree Kelly and have been thinking how I can do my business without so much technology; so that I’m a better example to my children. I would love to not have a family computer even. BUT then I wouldn’t see your blog ;-D Keep on searching out the old paths Kelly 😀

  3. Rebecca says:

    So amazing how God placed the same topic on our hearts today. Different but the same. Love the way you pulled David into it. A man after God’s own heart, but a sinner with issues of his own. That’s me..a sinner…saved by the grace of God.

  4. I am really struggling right now with this issue. My kids are involved with a game and everything about it (YouTube videos etc). It’s wearing me down. I can easily see they are addicted. I am planning a computer fast for all of us. My oldest has been asking to get an email account, become a vlogger and other stuff. I can see how this could turn ugly really quickly if I let her. I am praying for strength to be a firm parent and stick to principles instead of our culture. Please pray for me. I don’t have a facebook account or twitt and post on pinterest. I do have a blog that I post a couple of times a month and a YouTube channel that I showcase some of our family activities. It’s not much but I guess it’s enough to get my kids excited about hopping on this wagon. 🙁

  5. Kelly L says:

    Love the perspective and the nudge in the right direction.

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