Homeschooling Allows Pursuit of Strengths

One of my daughters is exceptional in one subject (which she loves), and mediocre in another (which she hates). She labors to balance the tension, to improve her deficiencies, which often causes her intense frustration.

As I encouraged her last week, I was glad to hear my own words; glad to take them to heart and articulate what I believe and not feel afraid about it.

I told her that God purposely gave most people specialties in one thing or another; interests or bents. Most of us aren’t good at everything, nor are we created to be. It’s part of HIS balance. It’s why there are those who are brilliant mechanics but hate Shakespeare.

Some love Shakespeare and become good writers or philosophers but couldn’t change the oil in their car. Some are gifted artists and are terrible at math. It’s what makes the world go ’round.

My goal as a homeschooling mother is to help my children flourish within their gifts. I want to give them room to explore their interests. I don’t want to put them in a box or give them a cookie-cutter education.

This is the beauty and freedom of homeschooling. May we be confident as we trust our parental instincts and help them bloom where God has planted them.

 

 

Learn all about RELAXED Homeschooling in Think Outside the Classroom!

 

 

 

 

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6 Responses to “Homeschooling Allows Pursuit of Strengths”

  1. Jennifer says:

    Kelly, I really needed this today! I have the same beliefs as far as gifts and talents but often times I let the fear creep back in that one child is “behind” in math and another isn’t quite where she “should be” with reading. Thank you for the encouragement this morning!

  2. Good morning…..our last daughter just graduated from homes teaching. I loved it when you said, “My goal as a homeschooling mother is to help my children flourish within their gifts. I want to give them room to explore their interests. I don’t want to put them in a box or give them a cookie-cutter education.” You will not regret it. Our girls are the last ones in our home. They will stay with us until the Lord gives them their husbands, if that is His will. They have so many interests! It is fun to watch them flourish!

    Blessings from our farm,
    Linda

  3. Cathy says:

    I think that you said this in not so many words, but I want to chime in to say that, despite being “mediocre,” and/or hating a particular subject, it is imperative that we teach our kids (and practice it ourselves) to do their very best. Although I homeschooled all ten of my kids, most of them eventually attended traditional school at some level of schooling. However, despite their aptitude toward particular subjects, I always told them that God demands (and deserves) our best efforts, and that it is an act of worship when we give it all we’ve got. That being said, where I live in CA, the “Voc Ed” classes have largely been eliminated, which is a travesty. Not everyone can be a doctor, lawyer, work in the high tech industry, etc., but, unfortunately, so many parents and administrations eschew the “blue collar” jobs as though they’re lesser. It’s a shame, too. God gifts people differently, and we should appreciate the differences.

  4. 6 arrows says:

    “Most of us aren’t good at everything, nor are we created to be.”

    This is the very thing I am trying to impress on one of my children in particular, but I don’t seem to be getting the message through. For my 11-year-old, almost everything comes easily for her. ALMOST, but not one subject. It seems that because she does so well with just about everything, she has no patience or tolerance for doing that which requires more of her effort. There are tears every day we work on this subject area, and she’s resistant to doing her best when her best in that doesn’t match her best in other areas.

    Two of her three older siblings had trouble in that subject, also, but it was around the age of twelve that their understanding of the subject began to click, which I’ve heard is a common age for things to start making sense when they didn’t before. So part of me says, just back off and wait until she’s older, and we won’t be having all these battles. OTOH, this is what is probably a perfect character-training opportunity for her, and I don’t think I should be passing it up in favor of taking the easy path. Some things in life just don’t come easily, and we can’t always decide that we just won’t tackle a thing because of its difficulties.

    Any suggestions for what I can say or do in this situation would be most welcome!

  5. Amy says:

    I agree, and as a public educator, I share these perspectives with my students as well.

  6. Kim M says:

    Love it, Kelly!

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