God’s Glory is Displayed Through GENDER

adam eveI almost had to leave the auditorium, retreat to a quiet place, and process the profound revelation I had never seen that Mary Kassian revealed from that familiar passage in Genesis:

“She shall be called ‘woman’ because she was taken out of man.” Genesis 2:23

We skip right over it and miss what God is revealing here.  Some of us even desecrate His very nature in our misunderstanding.

Paint it anyway you like, champion the philanthropic nature of feminism, but underneath all that it is rooted in the rebellion against God’s perfect, created design.

That verse in Genesis is not just about a man and woman being created to live together. It was God’s crowning work with which He announced to the world all the fullness of His glory.  He’s too big to be revealed in one human being.  It is VERY important that we understand that without the distinct characteristics in man and woman, meant to reveal Himself through the union of the two in marriage, we only see a part of who God is.

“She shall be called ISHA, for she was taken out of ISH.”

Now here it is:

“Isha” comes from a Hebrew word meaning “soft“, while “Ish” comes from the word meaning “strength“.  Now remember, God had said, “Let us make man in our image”.  Adam at first embodied the whole image of God.  (Even the word translated “man” in the first part of the verse has a different meaning than what we see after Eve was created.)  Literally, God took the feminine nature out of Adam and embodied that in a new creation.  God was screaming to Adam, and to us:

You can only fully understand Me by looking at the totality of Who I am through gender.”

The reason marriage is the illustrated picture of Christ and His bride is because it is the only way two distinctly different beings can come together and join as one flesh, representing the completed picture of who God is.

Is that not mind-blowing?

And when we embrace this uniqueness, celebrating our differences, we say to God, “It is very good”.

But when we bristle at and blur these differences we raise a fist and say, “It is not good”.

And the picture gets clearer…man reflects God’s “going out” power (even in the basic anatomy and events of reproduction), while woman reflects His “receiving” power in her anatomy and her ability to house and nourish life.

This is why homosexuality is an abomination to Him.  This is why a rejection of the gift of reproduction fails to display His glory.  This is why an egalitarian view of marriage makes a mockery of Him. This is why when we balk at the “warrior” nature of man and the “nurture” nature of woman we act foolishly.  It’s all Him!

Do you get this?

Makes me want to shout.

Speak well of God with your femininity.

68 Responses to “God’s Glory is Displayed Through GENDER”

  1. Jennifer says:

    “This is why when we balk at the “warrior” nature of man and the “nurture” nature of woman we act foolishly”

    That’s a valid thing to balk at, if it’s the ONLY picture we ever see of either gender.

    Amazing article, for the most part. One exception for me: Egalitarian marriage doesn’t in the least make a mockery of Him, since it allows two to truly become one and flourish in their gifts, rather than labeling one the “doer” and the other the “receiver”. Women are far more than receivers; we are very proactive, effective, multi-tasking, life-causing DOERS. Calling us receivers because of our anatomy is one of the reasons I hate complimentarianism and avoid conferences like this: they claim to honor women but ignore the whole picture and distort it, in fact. The reasons the miracles of gender are often so mysterious is because they’re about MORE than the “he does this, she does that” schlock. If God just wanted a leader and a servant to reflect His nature (and what an incredibly simple picture that would be to paint), He could have just created two magnets with opposite fields. Instead, man and woman share differences and similarities. I know you’re more complex than this system seems to imply, Kelly; even your daughter represents strength and is far more than just “isha”. Woman is neither pillow nor rock, but an entire world unto herself as every human being is. I’ve watched and read extensive egalitarian materials and they, not the simplistic pink and blue coded comp ones, leave me in awe of God’s blessing and mystery. Even so, I’d never claim that all “comp” marriages mock God. And the simple reason for this is that not only do many such marriages reflect true partnership more than they realize, but that every couple is different and complex; I could never define them with one word, even if they chose to do that to themselves.

    Having said that, I’ve never tried to blur the lines (a foolish accusation for Kassian to make against egals in any case); I love the differences between men and women, and collect both art and poetry/prose/etc celebrating them. A much better person to address this issue, I think, is Stasi Eldredge; she and her husband relate both the nurturing aspects and the warrior aspects of women while simultaneously advising us to encourage the warrior aspect in man. I see the differences clearly between men and women, yet it’s hard to describe them. You cannot make a mere list of them; the biggest proof is simply in watching them, especially in relation to each other. As far as that message goes, the article’s wonderful.

  2. brenda says:

    Very cool. It is so true. Where is that picture from?

  3. Violet says:

    You know…this is right on point. I’ve been bristling at the differences and not using them to glorify God. This is a very good understanding. Thank you so much for posting it!

  4. Margaret says:

    Love it.

    I’ve had so many conversations where it seems the goal is to blur and negate any differences. Why can’t we look at them as beautiful instead of restrictive?

    If you think about it, denigrating femininity and the generalized feminine qualities as not worth much is inherantly anti-woman, yet it is common practice in this culture. Why do we have to be like men, or be “better” than them, to be worthwhile human beings?

  5. Jennifer says:

    True, Margaret. Women are not defined by softness and nurture alone, but we are different.

  6. Word Warrior says:

    Jennifer,

    Far be it from me to oversimplify the differences in gender and claim that one characteristic in man negates any reflection of it in woman.

    –Word WARRIOR

  7. Lori says:

    Brenda – it appears to be a photograph of a wax sculpture of a perfect man and perfect woman. As such, I vote display from “Ripley’s Believe it or Not!” Heehee! 😛

  8. Lori says:

    Totally. Kidding. Not trying to be sacreligious or anything!

  9. Jennifer says:

    Thanks, Kelly. Like I said, I’ve seen firsthand from you that you don’t oversimplify it in general (you yourself are such a complex woman), but this is a fault I’ve just seen occasionally from certain folks in the comp camp, even accidentally.

  10. Jana says:

    I thought that was great, thanks for sharing Kelly! (Brenda, I believe that picture is from the Creation Museum in KY.)

    Jennifer, I have to disagree. Especially with this statement, “she and her husband relate both the nurturing aspects and the warrior aspects of women while simultaneously advising us to encourage the warrior aspect in man.”

    Simply because a characteristic is reflected in a woman (or in many women) does not mean GOD designed it that way. As a woman and a former Marine, I can tell you with certainty, the warrior and nurture aspects do not co-exist well together. Feminism wants us to have our cake and eat it to, and for that matter, the husband should be in the kitchen making it.

  11. Jane says:

    Yes, very mind blowing. Thanks for posting this Kelly. Love the way this truth is revealed here.

  12. Jennifer says:

    “she and her husband relate both the nurturing aspects and the warrior aspects of women”

    I didn’t say they did this at the SAME time.

    God most certainly designed it that way, Jana, at least in some women. I’m sorry you weren’t meant for the army. Of course everyone’s different and this means certain traits are large in some and small in others; this is what makes us all different and what my entire point is, in fact. Naturally not all traits are shown at their strongest simultaneously; neither men nor women on the battlefield are practicing their nurturing skills, quite obviously. There’s a time for everything. On the other hand, ironically, some women are at their warrior best when they’re defending their children! It’s way, way too easy to blame feminism for every evil you see; my feelings have nothing to do with it.

  13. Jennifer says:

    “I’m sorry you weren’t meant for the army”

    That wasn’t mean to be condescending. Most women aren’t meant for the military, at least not in physical combat (there are other ways to be warriors), but it’s a real shame when you don’t find this out until after you join. Sounds like this happened to you.

  14. Word Warrior says:

    Brenda–Jana is right about the pic 😉

  15. Jennifer says:

    A museum, wow. I’d have thought from a movie.

  16. Word Warrior says:

    What I’m understanding deeper and deeper as I study marriage and gender is that we fuss and fume when someone makes gender distinctions that we don’t like, we insist on being “equal”, yadda, yadda.

    But in a sense, God doesn’t even see us as two different people in marriage. Well, I’m mean He does, yes. But as far as roles go, He sees one, representing the whole of who He is. One flesh, the total of Him.

    Of course we muck it all up. God commands the husband to “love the wife as his own flesh”. In the spiritual sense that husband and wife reflect God’s image, when we read in Scripture that she is the “weaker vessel”, if we understood it properly, we would see that “weakness” as a perfect, beautiful part of God’s character, part of the husband, as she is “flesh of his flesh”.

    If you ponder the image of “the body of Christ” you can see it again…the hand is not looked upon with contempt, it is a very part of the rest of the body.

    So the husband looks upon the wife as part of him, and likewise the wife upon the husband. Two different parts, belonging together to equal one complete reflection of God.

    Too deep? I don’t know, I’ve just been really enjoying thinking about this since the conference.

  17. Jennifer says:

    Not too deep at all, I agree totally. The Love Dare expounds beautifully on this concept.

  18. Jennifer says:

    Oh, you changed the pic. I love that image, I still have the children’s Bible it’s featured in 🙂 When I was little I used to peruse it at doctor’s offices before I got my own copy. You know the first pic of Adam, kneeling in the sun ray with his arms up and spread? I used to picture him breaking into the Oklahoma song “O what a beautiful morning” as though Eden were a stage. Then of course Eve would take up the female chorus as soon as she rose 😛

  19. Lady Why says:

    “Speak well of God with your femininity.” I love that. Thank you for this thought provoking post!

  20. Word Warrior says:

    Jennifer,

    I was embarassed to realize that first pic. showed more of Eve than I originally thought *blush*

  21. Jennifer says:

    Ah. Well, I didn’t notice if that makes you feel better 🙂

  22. Sarah F says:

    Yep, I thought that first picture was a little saucy 😉

  23. Diane says:

    Kelly,you wrote: “Literally, God took the feminine nature out of Adam and embodied that in a new creation.”
    Wowsers.. how could I have never seen this before? Mind blowing is right! You know I have studied Genesis extensively, and have even done a year long Precepts study on marriage which centered around the first few chapters of Genesis, and I never saw this. Isn’t God’s Word amazing?

    And Sarah F wrote: ” Yep, I thought that first picture was a little saucy”
    Well girls, I’m kinda sorry I missed it;-)

  24. Word Warrior says:

    Diane,

    LOL! The first picture was the picture of the wax models at The Creation Museum…I just assumed “safe” without really even looking at it! Besides, it has a copyright.

  25. Kim M says:

    Great post, Kelly!

    We are visiting that museum in a couple of weeks. I know now that I won’t be able to look at Adam and Eve without laughing now. :-O

  26. Jennifer says:

    So was part of her chest more revealed than you thought or something? I honestly didn’t notice.

  27. Jennifer says:

    On the topic of homosexuality, I have to agree with you 100%.

  28. Jana says:

    Jennifer,
    Your comment was in fact not only wrong, but also rude. My career as a Marine (not army) was actually a model career, earning medals and commendations. My point wasn’t that women can’t have good careers in the military, but that the “warrior” nature takes a toll on women and their emotions in ways that it never does men. Women who are forced to find adequate care for their children and leave them behind for months at a time, find it very stressful and emotionally shattering. You are correct that women have the best “warrior” spirit when it somes to defending their children. Yet, God did not design women to operate in this mode at all times. He did in fact give women the “ISHA” and softer side of Himself. He did in fact, give men the “ISH” side of His nature. It’s an awesome and freeing concept when couples stop trying to make everything equal and just allow it to be complimentary.

  29. @ Jana – thank you from the bottom of my heart for your service – for all the difficulties women face when leaving their children, lets just say I wish they would choose not to join, to be spared that heartache. But I sincerely thank you all the same. 🙂

    “It’s an awesome and freeing concept when couples stop trying to make everything equal and just allow it to be complimentary.” Very well said – and it occurs to me that our “equality” was provided for through Christ. Why we (women)continue to agaitate for something we already have is beyond me. Covetousness enters into the picture at some point, it would seem.

  30. Jana says:

    @ the cottage child,
    That’s so kind of you. I think the main reason God allowed me to join was to see firsthand that the military is not part of his design for women! I gladly tell my friends and family to try to steer their daughters clear of that choice. I think you are exactly right about covetousness as well.

  31. Kelly L says:

    Love the post! So “AHA” moment. Love a lot of the comments too.

  32. Jennifer says:

    It doesn’t matter if you won medals, Jana; if you weren’t happy, it wasn’t for you. THAT was my point, so there’s no need for you to be so defensive. It’s ironic in fact, that you assumed I assumed you didn’t or couldn’t do a good job; quite the opposite, or I’d be contradicting my whole point. I agree with CC that women in the military, army or what have you deserve respect and gratitude for their services instead of the ungrateful and scathing criticism they so often receive from people insisting they’re wronging our country! Ironic indeed that you presumed I was insulting your contributions.

  33. Jennifer says:

    PS: It’s already complimentary. Women don’t “covet” their right to true fellowship and partnership with men; this is a hunger of the soul, not a gluttony. And they do indeed have a right to it already; their argument is with people who try to take that right from them.

  34. Jennifer says:

    “God allowed me to join was to see firsthand that the military is not part of his design for women!”

    There are women who have and DO contradict that, and they deserve our full respect just as you did.

  35. “There are women who have and DO contradict that, and they deserve our full respect just as you did.”

    Hi, Jennifer. Respectfully – do you have a Biblical context for that?

    On the practical side, we just saw a young mother dismissed from her post because she could find no one to care for her child during her tour. The judge was compassionate, but didn’t have to be. Her own bad judgement got her where she was. I am at a loss how to reconcile all of the social issues summed up in this one event, but ultimately, how can we say that mothers – or those who have the potential to become mothers – are suited to specific demands of military service? It’s not a question of equality, it’s a question of practicality. Covetousness enters the picture when our “hunger of the soul” endangers others. Can’t go there with you, sorry.

  36. Jennifer says:

    Hi, CC. Our hunger of the soul to fellowship with others and have equal regard couldn’t possibly endanger others; I wasn’t even talking about the military here.

    “How can we say that mothers – or those who have the potential to become mothers – are suited to specific demands of military service?”

    We don’t say this about all those women; very rare is the woman who is suited to the army. The military is different though: more women are perfectly suited to this, handling machines and such. Why all the focus on mothers anyway? The two main women I know who have served in the military did so in their single years. Anyways, I see no Bible passage either condoning or condemning. Biology and history speak for themselves: women suited for combat may be few, at least when compared to men, but when they’re found, they do their jobs and do them well.

  37. “Our hunger of the soul to fellowship with others and have equal regard couldn’t possibly endanger others”…actually, it endangers children on a daily basis, and others regularly. I don’t think I need to point out the sensationalistic (though deadly) examples. They exist, with their simple plucking down counterparts, all the same. The military was only one example, because of the context of our conversation.

    “Why all the focus on mothers anyway?”….spoken like a non-parent. Sorry, it’s not a fuss, but perspective with regard to my point is necessary. I’ll consider that, and pose the question better next time. From the point of view of aptitude v. suitability – by the instruction the Bible gives, I choose suitability coupled with Biblical direction. I’ll likely never be what all the educational testing suggest I should pursue – because my wordly career is tertiary, at best, with regard to my holy obligations. It’s not about me.

  38. Jennifer says:

    It does not endanger children for women to want to be allowed their full scope in God’s kingdom.

    “I don’t think I need to point out the sensationalistic (though deadly) examples”

    I think you might. What on earth are you speaking of?

    “spoken like a non-parent”

    No, spoken like one who knows not all women get married at 18 and have plenty of time in their single years to do things they might not be able to once married.

  39. Jennifer says:

    This is about women’s Holy obligations; we have obligations to use our gifts to the fullest and God is te one who gives us the hunger to do so.

  40. Jennifer says:

    “the” one

  41. Mothers (and fathers, because the mother also works) hurried on their way to work- or to shop or to attend class – who leave their children in the back of the car, forgetting to drop them off at day care, and the child dies, or the daycare bus driver forgets one of them, or the gate is broken at the child care center… this is just in Austin TX, that’s been reported, in the last six months.

    I didn’t get married at 18, not that that has anything to do with it. I married at 30, after pursuing and earning a luxurious living – and then learned better. There are women I know who married ten years earlier than I, who I consider wiser than myself, because they heeded the call of The One, not the self. The grass isn’t greener, only less Biblical, on the other side. I don’t feel the need to defend it – truth speaks for itself.

  42. SavebyGrace says:

    Actually we have an obligation to obey Scripture. Not run amuck with it and make it suit our own purposes. That, it appears, is what the ladies on this blog keep saying.

    I concur, with these ladies, about women serving in the military – not a place for ladies.

    There are many gifts dispersed among many women. Yes, these gifts should be used and liberally. But these gifts should be used to the glory of God not for any vain or selfish motive. They should also be used while under biblical authority – which God, Himself, set up.

    As far as parental viewpoint – I suggest you have children first before making any sweeping assumptions. Because just as it’s one thing to drive a car it is something else entirely to own the car one is driving. It is also different being a parent and not. Becoming a parent usually matures a person quickly and God’s viewpiont never changes.

    The issue apparently boils down to whether or not one is rooted in selfish, feminist belief versus the absolute Authority of God.

  43. Jennifer says:

    “The issue apparently boils down to whether or not one is rooted in selfish, feminist belief versus the absolute Authority of God”

    Actually it boils down to whether women follow God’s voice or man’s. One doesn’t need to run amok with Scripture in order to appreciate valid female soldiers.

    “Mothers (and fathers, because the mother also works) hurried on their way to work- or to shop or to attend class – who leave their children in the back of the car, forgetting to drop them off at day care, and the child dies, or the daycare bus driver forgets one of them, or the gate is broken at the child care center”

    Cottage Child-somehow I’m certain that you’re not implying that a woman having a job or a class has ANYTHING to do with an individual’s negligence. Especially the father’s, of all things. As such, it’s irrelevant to this topic. God calls all to different things; some women are called to classes or jobs while others are called to solely homemaking.

  44. Jennifer says:

    I don’t recall making any assumptions, sweeping or otherwise, about the parental viewpoint whatsoever.

  45. Jennifer says:

    Maybe this is a good way for me to explain the complexities I see in a woman. For one of my college classes a couple semesters ago, we had to make a collage on a foam board. I decided to do one representing woman, so I printed and cut out six different pictures of women online who were featured on book covers, mainly.

    One is the woman on the cover of “Created to be his Helpmeet”: She is dressed in a soft light color, has her hair swept gently back, and is leaning over flowers with an expression of the quietest content on her face. She represents woman’s quiet and gentle spirit.

    Another picture is of the woman on the cover of “Atonement Child”, standing reflectively at a large window, modestly dressed with hair the color and texture of a golden veil, and with an arm over her pregnant body. She represents woman’s maternal/mother spirit.

    Next, I chose a pic of the cover of a fantasy book called “Lady of Avalon”. A Celtic woman stands in priestess robes in a forest, eyes closed and hands directed toward the ground. She is clearly having a remarkable spiritual experience and even appears to be slightly ascending. She represents woman’s remarkable spirituality, a gift that connects with God, family, husband, children, and all those she closely touches.

    The picture directly beneath this one is somewhat similar. It’s a picture I’ve seen in various places and took from a book called “Kissing the Witch”. In a black and white photograph, you see a woman’s face, dark hair framing a white countenance, somewhat blurred in such a way that the tree in front of her actually merges with her image; it’s revealed that she’s up in the air. Her eyes are closed and she is so peaceful with her surroundings that she’s clearly a part of them; she may even be a soul or a spirit. This picture represents woman’s mystery: that allusive, white essence at a woman’s core that makes her unique and that men pursue in hopeful rapture their whole lives, hoping to touch and embrace ever so gently. This is what captivates good men, greatly a part of what motivates them to compose poetry about the part of their hearts attached to this essence, defying their understanding.

    Nearby this is a picture of particularly powerful imagery, showing a woman sitting atop an elevated peak of some sort, naked and directly beneath a lightening storm. Her head is upward, her eyes are closed, and one hand is stretched across her chest, gripping her other arm; everything about her taut posture shows that she is in a state of rapture, connecting directly and powerfully with the lightening above her, which seems in fact to be coarsing through her. This picture represents woman’s passion, in all things. When women reach into the power inside them and especially connect it with God, mountains move, lives are changed and people are transformed.

    The last picture is from the same artist(s) who painted the one above, artists known for their pictures of grandly beautiful men and women, both muscular and powerful yet retaining their unique gender-qualities. This picture shows a woman leaping in midair, a sword over her head, metal bands on her wrists, armor on her breast and an indomitable look of ferocity on her face. She represents a woman’s warrior spirit, one needed when defending and spreading the faith, protecting one’s children (and marriage), and battling other enemies. I had to trim a lot of this pic to fit it on the board and its outline is now, fittingly, in the shape of a tornado.

    *whew* That’s a good example of how I see woman and her different natures. Sorry it’s so long

  46. “Cottage Child-somehow I’m certain that you’re not implying that a woman having a job or a class has ANYTHING to do with an individual’s negligence. Especially the father’s, of all things.”

    I’m saying that a mother and father are by definition of those titles to observe them before anything else…Biblically, by God’s own example. Yes, a woman having a job or a class when she is a mother is negligent, if that other chosen obligation takes priority over the preservation of her primary charge. Once you’ve committed to being a parent, the choice is made. The holy contract is paramount. As an “elder” woman, eek, and a parent, and a wife, I also charge that fathers who seek fulfilment outside their homes for monetary gain, notice, and ego’s sake are no better. Prayerfully, there are Godly men who will counsel them.

    “God calls all to different things; some women are called to classes or jobs while others are called to solely homemaking.As such, it’s irrelevant to this topic.” God calls wives and mothers, with relief, to their families. I don’t see anywhere in Scripture that College is necessary to grow children, or a job is the road to personal fulfillment. Work all we can, earn all we can, give all we can – is noble, but a man-given direction nonetheless. I’m suggesting that following the Biblical call of serving our own families first might mitigate all the needs “out there”.

  47. wordwarrior says:

    cottage child,

    “God calls wives and mothers, with relief, to their families.”

    Aptly put.

  48. Jennifer says:

    Yes, I agree parenthood should be first in everything. Thanks for clarifying.

  49. Jennifer says:

    College isn’t necessary to grow children, but WE were not created just to procreate. A job, or career, can help define work that we do in God’s Kingdom.

  50. “A job, or career, can help define work that we do in God’s Kingdom.”

    In and of itself, no, it can’t.

  51. Jennifer says:

    It can if God intended for us to do it.

  52. Word Warrior says:

    Honestly, I haven’t followed this thread very closely…but regarding the last few comments between cottage child and Jennifer…

    Jennifer, the difference in the way we view women’s roles according to Scripture is that, as cottage child says, family–home, husband, children, are given CLEAR priority over everything else. (So much so that a widow was not even to be taken into count for support in the NT church is she hadn’t “brought up children” and taken care of others through hospitality.) With that said, and without saying, “it is a sin to work outside the home”, which I’m not at liberty to say, barring a dire situation where she must do that, it is impossible to give one’s full attention to the clearly defined job a wife and mother has already been given.

    Because that doesn’t set well with us “liberated” women, we justify that a house, husband and children can actually get along quite well without so much input from us.

    We are disillusioned.

  53. Jennifer says:

    I think it depends on the individual situation: what sort of job, how many children, how long the job is, whether the kids are homeschooled, etc. I do believe family takes priority over all else; I’ve never been “liberated” to think otherwise.

  54. Jennifer says:

    Thank you for your careful consideration of all these subjects, Kelly.

  55. Word Warrior says:

    Thanks, Jen…a little tiring today!

  56. Jennifer says:

    I hear you. This is why I’m not sure I’m ready for a blog.

  57. SavebyGrace says:

    Proverbs 27:17 Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.

    Kelly, you keep bringing up some of the most provoking topics! It is good to stand in the gap and you are doing a great job. I appreciate your adherence to scripture and you have remained a Lady at all times. Blessings!

  58. Word Warrior says:

    SavedbyGrace,

    Thank you!

  59. jen in AL says:

    WW, this is so great! Very well said! What a wonderful reminder to protect and proclaim what being a woman is! blessings, jen in al

  60. robert says:

    God himself describes to Moses who of the Israelites is to go to war in Numbers 1:1-5.

    A woman’s place biblically speaking is home. I cannot imagine what my children would turn out like without my wife. Actually yes I can, all i have to do is turn on the news.

  61. Leslie V says:

    I agree with Robert. Turn on the TV. This is the 3rd? generation of children with working moms. It’s not working out the way we thought it would. It turns out mothers are necessary and not easily replaced.

  62. R. F. says:

    Kelly,

    Thank you for sharing the truth all the time. It is refreshing to hear someone speak up for the role God desingned women to do. I’ve been feeling so much pressure by everyone around me to go out and work. My husband has had a hard time finding work (17% unemployment in our town) and in the past worked for himself. Everyone we know is telling him to stay home and have me get a job since I am the one with the college degree. Woman’s work (ie. not jobs in the trades) is easier to come by in our area.
    I have a hard time facing people, even at our church, who see me as the reason our family is struggling financially. If only I would get a job…
    I know better. So does my husband (even though he has had his moment of “Maybe they’re right…”). God did not give us four children in six years so I could walk away from them. I’m the one nursing the baby, I’m the one MADE for THIS job. I firmly believe God will provide my HUSBAND with work. We need to trust HIM and not try to accomplish things for God.
    Look at Sarah and Abraham. They did things their way when God took too long bringing their promised child. What did it bring them? Only more problems.
    We can learn a lesson from this.
    Stand strong and trust God. He does know best.

  63. Jennifer says:

    That’s not her only place, Robert. And we haven’t spoken only of mothers.

  64. Word Warrior says:

    R.F.,

    I fully understand your fear and anxiety. I’ve been there more times than once. And you are right…on the other side of it, you will be amazed at things God is doing in your life, your faith and your testimony…things you probably can’t see now. Keep trusting, keep walking. “Do not worry about what you will eat or what you will wear…”

  65. R.F. – sending encouragement your way…coming from a creative industry, I’ve found the highest use of my creativity being making much of little (sometimes nothing). It’s not only “plenty” – it’s extremely satisfying, walking in faith (though admittedly somewhat wobbly on my part) and my husbands own work life has blossomed in the process. He is a better husband because he supported my role of being a faithful wife (his words, my reward!). It’s amazing to live – I pray for and admire your continued faithfulness. Anyone can throw up their hands and go get a job – you cannot be replaced in your current role, nor your husband in his.

  66. Jennifer says:

    Thanks for the note of inspiration, CC.

  67. […] that in mind, let’s take a look at an article called God’s Glory is Displayed Through GENDER. It centers on an epiphany experienced by the author during a talk on Gen. 2:23, which tells of […]

  68. Simona Latu says:

    Thank you a bunch for sharing this with all people you actually recognise what you’re talking about! Bookmarked. Please also talk over with my site =). We may have a link change agreement among us

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